Author Topic: The Mindset Of Shop Owners  (Read 792 times)

Offline leefert

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The Mindset Of Shop Owners
« on: June 05, 2018, 23:04:46 »
I stopped in a shop this week that formerly sold Playmobil. The owner said, “When they hit the mass market big box stores, I drop them.” I wanted to tell her that she had it all wrong. Being available in the mass market is what could make people seek out more. Needless to say, I was disappointed in her decision because it meant that there was another brick and mortar store no longer carrying it. It’s sad really, her shop was almost completely empty.
I'm glad that I'm not the only one :)

Offline Klickteryx

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Re: The Mindset Of Shop Owners
« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2018, 21:23:36 »
Reminds me of stores that don't stock "war toys". Probably kept going by an army of those well meaning people that buy gifts for children, boys particularly, who dread opening them.

Offline gloobey

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Re: The Mindset Of Shop Owners
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2018, 21:17:50 »
As a shop owner I can say that it's very difficult to carry a line that moves to big box. We just can't compete with that buying power. It's really up to the toy company (in this case Playmobil) as to where they want their product to be. When you operate month-to-month decisions get made quickly. I drop lines all the time for various reasons. I have continued to carry Playmobil because it's my favorite toy, the best in the world. I've worked hard to keep it, but I can understand other business owners dropping it if they don't have that passion.

Unfortunately, money, and survival are a reality in business. I do my best to separate those issues from the magic that I try to bring into my shops. Hopefully there are other business owners out there that feel the same way!
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Offline playmovictorian

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Re: The Mindset Of Shop Owners
« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2018, 00:09:24 »
A very interesting topic indeed. Thank you for sharing an insight of what being a Toy Shop Owner in 2018 means. Both in France and England I can see shops closing down and this saddens me. Here in Marlow, we still have an old fashioned Toy Shop which is a joy to visit and purchase from, even if their stock is limited. What used to be norm back in the days is a rarity nowadays to be able to engage in a conversation with someone who is really listening and has a lifetime of experience behind them. Without sounding over nostalgic, I am so glad to have been able to live and witness worldwide thriving communities with busy shops busy and happy customers conversations  :love:
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Offline Wesley Myers

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Re: The Mindset Of Shop Owners
« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2018, 14:15:01 »
A lot of the shops have closed because the owners want to get out of working and retire.  Younger entrepreneurs do not want to open toy stores (nor hobby shops!).

While big box stores may carry a few larger items or some sets they think may sell well, they will never stock all the unique smaller sets that helps set Playmobil apart.

Offline GrahamB

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Re: The Mindset Of Shop Owners
« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2018, 01:08:23 »
I like small toy shops, but if I want to fondle My?tery Figure bags, I don't go to those shops, the staff seem very vigilant, desperate to make a sale even, so manipulating the merchandise seems rude! But fewer and fewer small toy shops exist.

I like the fact that some shops operate ethical stock policies, but that's a luxury which most can't afford. Early Learning Centre (UK toy store chain) had a TV ad. a few years ago showing Action Man and Barbie being refused entry to their shop.... but a few months later there were Barbies for sale on the shelves.

Does Geobra even have a marketing strategy? You can't move for Lego in most shops, but Playmobil is becoming a rarity.
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Offline Klickteryx

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Re: The Mindset Of Shop Owners
« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2018, 13:00:17 »

I like the fact that some shops operate ethical stock policies, but that's a luxury which most can't afford. Early Learning Centre (UK toy store chain) had a TV ad. a few years ago showing Action Man and Barbie being refused entry to their shop.... but a few months later there were Barbies for sale on the shelves.
Shops have to make money, if children don't want the carob and tofu toys being sold they'll go out of business.

Quote
Does Geobra even have a marketing strategy? You can't move for Lego in most shops, but Playmobil is becoming a rarity.
That's happened here again. It's not as bad as the late 90s when it practically disappeared, but it's nothing like it was four years ago. I stopped going into shops about a year ago and the mailing list I was on only advertised lego. Perhaps they sell so much online (including Amazon etc) that stocking it in shops, at least outside their core region of central/western Europe, isn't a priority to them.

On a vaguely related note, Blockbuster video is down to a single video shop somewhere in Oregon. My local one closed down a few years ago and the last video shop (a Video Ezy) closed down a month ago. Some businesses are just not viable these days thanks to the internet and changing tastes.